Butch From Beloit


On Father’s Day, like so many, it was golf day…first on the course and then in front of the TV watching the U.S. Open, and in between, it was in the pool listening to the Brewers game. But on this day, while much of this is about golf, it all began with baseball.

This is about Alvin R. When I first met him, he seemed like a giant behind the small counter of the pro shop at Beloit Municipal Golf Course. My dad said, as we were entering, ‘That’s Butch Krueger. He led the U.S. Open once.’

Once…it seemed so long ago. He wasn’t the first from the State of Wisconsin to lead the most prestigious golf tournament in the country, but he certainly was the best all around athlete to lead the tournament. Sorry Andy North. But Butch was not only a great golfer but a big time pitcher and star basketball player. As a star pitcher for the Madison Blues, a team which in 1942 would become the class ‘B’ team for the Chicago Cubs, he was known to start three games in a week. But that wasn’t his biggest outing on the sporting stage.

This was…the 1935 U.S. Open Golf Championship at Oakmont in Pittsburgh.

1935 U.S. Open Golf Championship
First Round June 6, 1935
#1 -1 Under Par
Butch Krueger
 United States
71
−1

#2 E
Roland MacKenzie
 United States

72

T3 +1 Over Par
Herman Barron
 United States

73
+1
Cliff Spencer
 United States
Horton Smith
 United States
Jimmy Thomson
 Scotland

T7 74 +2 Over Par
Tommy Armour
 United States

Ed Dudley
 United States
Jim Foulis
 United States
Macdonald Smith
 Scotland

ALVIN KRUEGER LEADS NATIONAL OPEN OPENING DAY FIELD
Making the only successful attack on Oakmont’s dreaded par after one of the most calamitous opening days in the history of the United States Open golf championship, Alvin (Butch) Krueger, 29 years old semi-pro pitcher and a golf professional at Beloit, Wis., yesterday led an international field of shot makers with 35-36 71, one under par. The red-headed Wisconsin entry, a “dark horse,” was the only player among 157 starters to crack par for the full route over a course that raised havoc with some of the most famous figures in American golf. Rallies Near End He pulled a garrison finish to take over the first day’s lead from Roland MacKenzie, former amateur ace and now professional at the Congressional Country club of Washington, D. C. MacKenzie’s par-equalling round, 3S-34 72, had stood up under heavy bombardment most of the afternoon. Krueger touched off the fireworks at the close of nearly 12-hours of desperate, heart-breaking warfare with the bunkers of Oakmont. In this, the Thirty-Ninth National Open Tournament, for weeks there had been tales about the horrors and hazards of the Oakmont course. It took 301 strokes to finish first in the 1927 open tourney, played here, and natives predicted it would take as many if not more this time. “Yeah,” said Krueger, “I heard that, too, but what of it? If a fellow hits ’em straight he’s bound to score.” With few exceptions. Krueger “hit ’em straight” yesterday and he hit them long, too. So, as the sun dipped behind the Allegheny Mountains, he came in with a one-under-par 71, fashioned from a 35 and a 36. This feat supplanted the early leader, Roland MacKenzie, former well-known amateur and now professional at the Congressional Country’ Club. Washington. D. C.. who had a par 72.

It was the longest and by all odds the most gruelling start for any American Open championship since the event was last held on this back-breaking, 6,981-yard layout eight years ago. More than half the field failed to break 80. At least a dozen were within hailing distance of old man par but only two were able to draw up level and look him in the eye as Krueger came through to beat him in the stretch! and overhaul MacKenzie. Although Gene Sarazen’s 75 left him four shots behind at the outset and champion Olin Dutra’s 77 was six strokes off the pace, the vanguard of contenders was well bunched. Third Place Tie Trailing with 73’s, in a tie for third place, were Herman Barron of White Plains, N. Y., Cliff Spencer of Washington, D. C, Horton Smith of Chicago, and Jimmy Thomson, the “siege gun” from Long Beach, Calif. Another quartet was bracketed at 74. comprising big Ed Dudley of Philadelphia, Tommy Armour and Jim Foulis of Chicago, and MacDonald Smith, the Scotch veteran from Glendale, Calif. Most of these old or new figures In the title hunt had opportunities to beat Krueger to the scoring punch in the closing drive, but none was able to match the cool, calculating skill of the 29 years old Wisconsin player. Competing in his second National Open, the slim, wiry Krueger withstood terrific tension to play the last six holes in one under par, giving as fine a shot making exhibition in “the pinches” as ever made in the pitching box. His 35 Going Out Krueger had served notice of his sensational finish by going out in 35. two under par and equalling the day’s best performance for the first half of Oakmont’s bunkered battleground. He had par apparently whipped to a standstill, scoring “knockdowns” by dropping a five-foot putt for a birdie on the second hole and barely missing an eagle as he ran a 30-footer “dead” to the ninth pin. By this time the survivors of an original gallery of more than 4,000 spectators had heard the word and flocked in pursuit of the westerner. Whether or not this rattled him, he experienced a temporary lapse. He scrambled from the rough for his par in the 10th, was bunkered and lost a stroke on each of the next two holes before buckling down to a brilliant finish. His 12-foot putt dropped for a deuce on the 164-yard 13th, and he got down another of equal length on the 14th to save his par. The red head took three putts from 80-feet on the loth, which was entirely excusable and among the day’s commonest occurrences, but he came back to furnish his biggest thrill on the 234-yard 16th. Using a brassie off the tee, he hit the ball within a foot of the cup, for his second deuce. He had par under control again ana made no mistakes as he collected fours on the last two holes. playing a great iron on the home hole.’

Second Round
Butch fired a 77 to finish +4, 2 behind Jimmy Thompson.

Third Round
Saturday, June 8 (morning)
Butch shot a 78, the night best round but tied with Walter hagen for 4th, +10

Fourth and Final Round
Saturday, June 8 1935 (afternoon)
Butch shot a disappointing 80, finishing tied for 6th, +18as Sam Parks, Jr. won +11 and the $1,000 winners check. Butch won $218, equivalent to $3,927.77 today.

A couple of months later, the headline read:
KRUEGER TIES WITH RUNYAN FOR GOLF LEAD
Pros Shoot Sizzle 67 to Top Field of 130 in $5,000 Louisville Open (By Associated Press) LOUISVILLE, Ky., Oct. 12. Led by the sizzling 67 of Alvin “Butch” Krueger and Paul Runyan, a field of 130 golfers, all but a half dozen of them professionals, today moved into the second round of the Louisville $5,000 open. Krueger, semi-pro baseball pitcher of Beloit, Wis., who said he had tried every form of sport and turned to golf seriously only two years ago,’ and Runyan, White Plains, N. Y., pro who has chased golf birdies nearly all his life, were four under par on the course. The low 50 and ties in today’s 18 hole round move into the 36 hole final Sunday. Tied for second, a stroke behind the leaders were Frank Walsh, Chicago, and Victor Ghezzl, Deal, N. J. (who won the 1941 PGA Championship), with 68s. Ed Dudley of Philadelphia, Arthur Bell of San Mateo, Cal., E. R. Whltcombe of the British Ryder cup team, Terl Johnson, Winter Haven, Fla., and Al Zimmerman, Northwest Open titlist from Portland, Ore., were tied up for fifth position with 69 each. Only two top flight contenders failed to qualify. Leo Dlegel, former P.G.A. and Canadian Open champion, withdrew at the turn when his card showed 41, and Alfred Perry, British Open champion, with 78 was the only member of the Ryder cup team eliminated.

A week later, in Oklahoma City, OK, on Saturday, October 19, 1935, found him battling Gene Sarazen at the National Professional Championship at the Twin Little Golf Club and beat ‘The Gentleman’ 2 and 1, advancing into the field of 16 on Sunday. The 29 year old Beloit redhead, who was competing in his first P.G.A tournament ‘is probably one of the most talented athletes in the country. He has averaged three games a week pitching for the Madison Blues and has a basketball record which made him considerable money on the professional side. He has been a golf professional only a little more than three years, but it didn’t take him long to make himself known, for he is now one of the finest of the younger pros.

Their match, the seventh of sixteen to go out, brought out the largest morning gallery of the week, one which grew to 4,000 by the time they left the tenth tee. They had come up to the ninth all even, and the 11th saw Krueger go one up. saracen evened it at the next hole, but Butch took the 14th and 15th with handsome golf, while the little Italian wa struggling to say on the fairways. That two up lead was sufficient to save Krueger from one of the typical Sarazen finishes. All Butch needed to shot out the three time winner of this crown was that noble niblick on the 17th, just when it appeared that Gene would win the hole and prolong the match to the finishing hole.

On December 10, 1935, Alvin Krueger, Beloit, Wis., was the 54 hole leader in the Sarasota Open as he fired a corse record 66. With the heading, ‘He can Groove ‘em Now’ as the photo state that Alvin Krueger, Beloit, Wisc., Pro Baseball pitcher who doubles in golf, grooved his efforts recently to lead the field in the Sarasota, FLA, $2000 Open Golf Tournament with a 67, four under par, for the first round. (He broke the course record the next day with a 66). Krueger is a lead-off specialist, have paced the National Open field to the first turn at Oakmont last June.”

In 1936, ‘Butch’ was one of the most sought after golfers for endorsements. He joined Al Espinosa and Babe Didrikson on the staff of The P. Goldsmith Sons, Inc., Cincinnati and had his name on Goldsmith woods and irons in two price ranges. The Grueger woods were sold for $9 and $6.50; the irons (flange soled) were $7.50 and $5. His performance identifies him as a ‘shining one of the youngsters stars with a fine future ahead of him. An all-around athlete, he has been a pro golfer only five years and is picked by Al Espinosa, head of the Goldsmith playing squad, as a youngster who will stay long with he lands at the top.

Two years later, Alvin ‘Butch’ Krueger tied for sixth in St. Paul Open golf meet. Aug. 4th.

Then on June 11, 1938, Alvin (Butch) Krueger, Beloit pro, the former baseball pitcher from Beloit, shot a sub-par 69 to remain within the first 15with a 148 for the first 36 holes of the U.S. Open Championship at Cherry Hills Country Club, Denver, Colorado.

A year later, Charley Bartlett golf expert of the Chicago Tribune covered the Central Intercollegiate track meet at Milwaukee and Bartlctt asked regarding Alvin ‘Butch; Krueger, the Beloit pro and Madison Blues pitcher. Charley believed that Krueger had few it any superiors in golf from tee to within 140 yards of the green. He felt that Krueger would be one of the big shots in pro link circles were the pitcher/golfer able to putt. Bartlett was one of the few who waited for Krueger to finish at Oakmont some years ago after a majority of the other Eastern golf scribes had written their stories giving a player with a 71. But Bartlett had watched Krueger in Chicago and knew he was a capable performer and Butch came home at dusk with a great finish to top the field The other scribes had to cancel their yarns and sit down and write new leads.

At 12:17 on the 1st Tee #70 in the field, Alvin ‘Butch’ Krueger, Beloit Municipal Golf Course, Beloit, Wis. was pared with Klarke Morse, of Wellston, MO, along with Leo ‘O’Grady, East Amherst, NY, teed up for the Silver Anniversary PGA Championship, at Seaview Country Club Atlantic City, NY on May 25, 1942. In the field were Ben Hogan, Ralph Guldahl, Sam Parks, Jr. (who had won the 1935 U.S. Open) Gene Sarazen, Byron Nelson, Jimmy Demaret, Lloyd Mangrum and Sam Sneed among the 116 best pro golfers in the world.

In 1976, Krueger was named to the Wisconsin Golf Hall Of Fame.
1976 – ALVIN R. “BUTCH” KRUEGER

I never knew Butch Krueger was a red head. I remember him sitting on the bench of the second tee and saying, ‘Just hit it straight down the middle. You’ll never get in trouble and it will allow you to plan on your second shot.’ His hair was gray. But he was still athletic looking. And his tone was always reassuring.

One day I brought my catcher mitt to the course in my golf bag and on one of the fairways, I think it was the fourth, I pulled out my glove and ball Butch and I had a catch. It was one of those rare days in the Fall when few were on the course. That’s one of my most memorable moments with this once leader of the U.S. Open.

Here’s to Butch Krueger who on this Father’s Day should be enjoying watching the U.S. Open from Erin Hills and the Brewer game from his position looking down on all of us.

The Mystical, Mysterious, Magical Tour


Part Houdini, part Blackstone. The Master of Minestrone in Baseball. 2 tablespoons of 30+ rookies, 1 large Korean import. 1 slightly crumbling superstar. 3 great young arms. 1 relief pitcher. An overpaid starting pitcher who has been on the DL more than not. Hercules who sometimes plays first. Two catchers who are an equal part of one. A second baseman with all the speed in the universe but no baseball brain. A centerfielder who simply can’t find his hitting grove. And absolutely there is no rhyme err thyme or reason why this concoction should work. But the Wizard of Whitefish Bay has leaned on a learned master in his dugout and worked closely with a newbie GM, and stirred this unbelievable pot of people like himself into a winning unit. In fact, his team, the beloved Milwaukee Brewers have risen to the top of the Central Division of the National League on Sunday, June 11, 2017. Are you kidding me?

Last night in Arizona in 106 degree temperatures with the roof open (the D’Back’s owner is so cheap…How cheap is he?) there was a 30+ refugee at First Base, a 30+ refugee at 2nd base; a multidimensional player at 3B; a first baseman playing left field (and it looked like a 1st baseman who was playing left field); a rookie in centerfield who got his first hit on Monday, sent down on Wednesday, brought back up on Thursday; and regular players in right field, shortstop and catching.

The night before, in 106 degree temperatures with the roof open (the D’Back’s owner is so cheap…How cheap is he?) every regular position player was used in a two run victory. Every player off the bench was used. That doesn’t usually happen in non-extra inning games. But the Wizard of Whitefish Bay was busy mixing his concoction and cooked up another victory.

On the record, they are 1 game ahead of the World Champions of last year. And they have a winning record on the road, one of only three teams in the National League to do so (Washington and Colorado are the others, both leading their divisions). They are the only team in their division with a winning record and one of only five in the league to do so. How good are they? Who knows?

This is a real team…a group of guys who are bonded with…their skipper and their bench coach. They are a group of carrots and onions, with a bit of mystery thrown in. And as they continue on this unbelievable magical tour of a baseball season, from city to city, they are exceeding all expectations.

Don’t wake up.

Don’t do anything you didn’t do yesterday.

Don’t change your socks or shoes.

This is a ride that no one knows how long it will last but on this wave, it is going much longer than anyone expected.

Just enjoy.

Play ball!

#watchingattanasio⚾️

This Time In The Natty

The first time he was in Cincinnati, Scooter hit a home run. This was his boyhood team. And he had done the improbable right at home. Ryan Joseph “Scooter” Gennett was the future second baseman of the Milwaukee Brewers for four years. He was by all standards, a fan favorite.

In his tenure, he batted .279 and hit 35 home runs in Milwaukee. On Tuesday, back home again in his home town in another uniform, and he hit one-seventh of that total in one game.

While it all began with Beaneaters in 1894, on Tuesday for only 17th time, Scooter did something for which he will always be remembered. He did something Lou Gehrig did.

#watchingattanasio⚾️

Play Ball!

Time


The Game of Baseball is measured in memory, in the senses…in the mind. An accumulation of this is what baseball is all about. In the hurry hurry and rushy rushy of today’s world, some forget that baseball was never in a rush to complete. In the world focused on Millennial behavior and the never ending try to capture them in the sales cycle, some have said that the game has to speed up. Saul Steinberg said, ‘Baseball is an allegorical play about America, a poetic, complex and subtle play of courage, fear, good luck, mistakes, patience about fate, and sober self-esteem.’

For many Millennials, they are too impatient and too busy to understand any of this. But all of this is about attracting Millennials. A 2015 study by Microsoft revealed that the average person’s attention span in this wild world of technology and social media is down to eight seconds, which is less than that of a goldfish.

What are the facts about baseball and the length of the game. Yesterday, Saturday, May 20, 2017, of the thirteen games played (two were postponed, one for rain and the other out no rain https://www.facebook.com/Overtheshouldermlb/) the average time of the game was 3 hours and 0 minutes. The longest was the Yankees v Rays which took 3:50 and the shortest was the Indians v Astros which took 2:35. So if you were in Tampa Bay, you were at the ballpark an hour and fifteen minutes longer than in Houston. But as Humphrey Bogart said, ‘A hot dog at the ballgame beats roast beef at the Ritz’. Perhaps Millennials don’t appreciate all that nitrate. NOTICE: Hot dogs don’t have nitrate in them anymore.

But what about the other major sports. In 2016, the average MLB game ran 2:56. The average NFL game ran 3:07. The Average NBA game ran 2:59. Only the average NHL game was decidedly less with games averaging 2:30.

Babe Ruth said, ‘Baseball changes through the years. It get milder’. This should be a reminder to all of us who are fans that changes come to the games slower than most sports. While there is still 90’ between bases, there are designated hitters today in the American League. While a mark of excellence in starting pitchers was once finishing a complete game, for many pitchers today, it is getting through 6 innings that mark a ‘quality start’. No more crashing into the catcher at home. Shifts, defensively, are everywhere.

Perhaps baseball is not made for the Millennial mind. Perhaps it never was. It is the time when you are building careers, new relationships, families, personal responsibilities. But when people find a time when they have to find a place to get away from all of the maddening crowd, they go to baseball, where time is not a factor. It is a place where memories are built. Dad’s and Mom’s bring their young children to the ballpark and the cycle of fandom begins anew. ‘This is a gem to be savored, not gulped. There’s time to discuss everything between pitches or between innings’, Bill Veeck told us. Families actually get to know each other at the ballpark.

Ken Burns noted, ‘Nothing in our daily life offers more of the comfort of continuity, the generational connection of belonging to a vast and complicated American family, the powerful sense of home, the freedom from time’s constraints, and the great gift of accumulated memory than does our National Pastime.’

On this date in 1943, the Chicago White Sox topped the Washington Senators 1-0 in one hour and 29 minutes. Today that would cause indigestion.

Play Ball!

Facebook Hits It Out Of The Park


Facebook on Thursday announced a partnership with MLB that will bring 20 baseball games to the social media network. The games are free for all viewers and will air live each Friday, beginning with today’s match between the Colorado Rockies and the Cincinnati Reds. #dailydiaryofscreens 🇺🇸🇬🇧🇦🇺💻📱📺🎬🌎🗺️

The 127th Day


This date is a memorable date for a couple of reasons. It marked a date which saw power pitchers reach a cornerstone in their lives.

When fans watch baseball today, it is very different from years ago. Nobody has to face ‘The Big Train’ or Herb Score, Bob Feller, Sandy Koufax, Bob Gibson, Nolan Ryan or a Randy Johnson. When you went to a game featuring those power starting pitchers, there was a chance you could see a no-hitter. Yet the one thing you could count on was that batters were just a bit on their toes when facing the heat of these power pitchers.

On this date, in 1917, Babe Ruth of the Boston Red Sox allowed only two hits as he out pitched Walter Johnson of the Washington Senators, 1-0. Can you imagine being there for that game? Oh, by the way, Ruth knocked in the winning run with a sacrifice fly. In that year, he would go on to start 38 games and win 24 against 13 losses. He had an ERA of 2.01. In Babe Ruth’s 1916 season as a pitcher, his record was 23 Wins and 170 Strikeouts, with a 1.75 ERA, 9 Shutouts and 23 Complete Games, as he was at the time, one of the best pitchers in baseball. He was undefeated as a pitcher in postseason play. In 1916, he had a 1-0 record with an ERA of 0.64 against the Brooklyn Dodgers. In 1918, he went 2-0 against Chicago Cubs with a 1.06 ERA. The last time he ever pitched, was in the 1933 All-Star game, when he started and won. Thus what began in 1914 as a pitcher, ended up on the mound 20 years later…a winner. Overall, he won 94 games pitching, losing 46 with a 2.28 ERA lifetime.

Jumping ahead to 1957 on this date, it was another sort of a day in Cleveland as the Indians were facing the New York Yankees in a night game. Herb Score, the fireballing left hander was coming off of a 20 win season the year before where he finished with a 20-9 record with 5 shutouts, an ERA of 2.53 with 263 strikeouts. In his first two years, he was an All-Star and was already 2-1 in the ’57 season. Facing Gil McDougald, as the second batter in the inning, the count was 2 and 2. He shook off the both the curve and slider because he felt he lacked command of his breaking stuff. On his 12th pitch of the night, he fired a fastball that had helped him earn 508 strikeouts over his first two season.

The pitch was low and inside and McDougald lined it up the middle. This is what Herb Score said about the rest. ‘I heard the crack of the bat while my head was down in my follow-through. All I ever saw as my head came up was a white blur. I snapped up my glove, but the white blur blasted through the fingertips and into my right eye. I clutched at my face, staggered and fell. Then I thought, ‘My God, the eye has popped right out of my head!’. Cleveland’s Municipal Stadium was hushed as the career of one of baseball’s best young pitchers and a sure Hall of Famers was finished.

Laying near the mound, bloody and battered, he called on his patron saint for help. He left the field cracking jokes, ‘They can’t say I didn’t keep my eye on that one’, he told teammate Mike Garcia on the field.

In the Yankee clubhouse after the game, McDougald was disconsolate. The seven year veteran and as the American League rookie of the year, told his teammate Hank Bauer, ‘If he loses his sight, I’ll quit baseball. The game’s not that important when it comes to this.”

Talking to Jimmy Cannon the following year he was asked if he felt like giving up. Score said, ‘Give up? I never gave up. When I was first hit, they bandaged both eyes. I could hear people walking. I thought we never appreciated what God does for us. We never think what it is to see. I can see very well. My ankle has been a little sore. But the eye, the only problem I have now is to get the fellows out.’

This date in baseball history is powerful. First we see what a phenomenal player the mighty Babe Ruth was. Secondly, we see what a real man Herbert Jude Score was.

Play Ball!

Eric…Hits The Ball Real Far

‘He’s a comic book hero with a prep school education.’ That is what Adam Karen, Eric Thames agent was told by the Korean representatives as they were in pursuit of Thames for the NC Dinos in the Korean League. A graduate from Bellarmine Prep, a private Jesuit school in San Jose, California, then majored in Integrated Marketing at Pepperdine University, Mr Thames was drafted in the 7th round by the Toronto Blue Jays in 2008. In 2011 and 2012 he was a platoon player while appearing in 141 games and batting .257 with 15 HRs and 48 RBI. On July 30, 2012, he was traded to the Seattle Mariners for Steve Delebar. In Seattle, he appeared in 40 games during batting .220 with 6 HRs and 15 RBI. On June 30, 2013, he was traded to the Baltimore Orioles for Ty Kelly and did not appear in a single game. Then on September 5, 2013, he was selected off Waivers by the Houston Astros. In the field, he only had 5 errors. Disappointed, but not discouraged, he went and played in the Venezuelan Winter Ball league in December 2013.

By this time, the Dinos understood a couple of things: Eric Thames was covered in tattoos and had a big personality while in 633 at bats in the major leagues, he had hit 21 HRs and driven in 54 RBI, had an on base percentage of .296 and a slugging percentage of .431. He was not afraid to travel to other countries to play ball. They understood what this would translate for their fans in Southeastern Korea.

According to Jerry Crasnick, ESPN Senior writer (11/29/16), ‘After signing with the Dinos, Thames bought the Rosetta Stone Korean program and dove head-first into learning the language. “When you look at this as just a paycheck, that’s when you struggle,” Thames said. “The key is to enjoy the ride. Fully embrace the experience. [The] Hangul [alphabet] is pretty easy to learn, so I was able to pick it up easily. I am not fluent by any means, but speaking like a baby is better than not knowing any at all.”

As Thames immersed himself in the Korean culture and began clearing fences with regularity, he developed an ardent following. He patiently signed autographs for long lines of fans at Masan Stadium, and he grew accustomed to having meals interrupted by fans in search of selfies. “Going anywhere with him is insane in that country,” Karon said. “It’s like going out with the Beatles. Girls are crying and people are trying to touch him and get pictures. I’ve never seen anything like it.”

In Korea he put up cartoon numbers. In 2015, Thames won the MVP award and a Gold Glove at first base, became the first KBO player to hit 40 homers and steal 40 bases in a season, logged a .391/.497/.790 slash line and became the first player in Korean baseball to hit for the cycle twice in the same season. In 2016, Thames regressed slightly, but he still hit 40 homers and logged an OPS of 1.101 for the Dinos, who lost to the Doosan Bears in the KBO final, known as the Korean Series.

According to Crasnick, ‘Thames showed a strong work ethic in Korea and was popular with his teammates. The natural question was how his skills would translate to the majors. Could he adjust to higher level of competition and bigger ballparks in the majors? Thames has more of a line-drive swing than loft power. Could he catch up to 94-95 mph fastballs after feasting on 89-91 mph heaters in the KBO? “He’s very aggressive at the plate and on the field, too, for that matter,” a scout said. “He’s a first-ball fastball hacker, boy. He’s trying to hit the ball hard. Sometime you see guys who are happy to make contact and put the ball in play. That’s not him. He’s gonna hurt somebody someday.”

Thames’ defense in the outfield was considered below-average in Toronto. He moved to first base in Korea and would most likely be viewed by MLB teams as a combination first baseman-corner outfield-DH candidate. A National League front office man said he wouldn’t be surprised if teams were willing to give Thames a multiyear deal to return to the States. “You have an element that’s going to be skeptical,” the executive said. “He’s already played over here, and he wasn’t a tremendous success the first time. But you have to ask yourself, ‘Is this guy a late bloomer?’ “Look at some of the money that Cuban players have gotten. What’s the difference here? I think somebody is going to bite, and he’ll get a contract for two years and $12 million, or three years and $15-18 million.”‘

So far, through Saturday, he has appeared in 23 games, hit 11 HRs, driven in 19 RBI while batting .350 with an OPS of 1.312.

What an April. What a month.

Will it last?

#watchingattanasio⚾️

Play Ball!