Butch From Beloit


On Father’s Day, like so many, it was golf day…first on the course and then in front of the TV watching the U.S. Open, and in between, it was in the pool listening to the Brewers game. But on this day, while much of this is about golf, it all began with baseball.

This is about Alvin R. When I first met him, he seemed like a giant behind the small counter of the pro shop at Beloit Municipal Golf Course. My dad said, as we were entering, ‘That’s Butch Krueger. He led the U.S. Open once.’

Once…it seemed so long ago. He wasn’t the first from the State of Wisconsin to lead the most prestigious golf tournament in the country, but he certainly was the best all around athlete to lead the tournament. Sorry Andy North. But Butch was not only a great golfer but a big time pitcher and star basketball player. As a star pitcher for the Madison Blues, a team which in 1942 would become the class ‘B’ team for the Chicago Cubs, he was known to start three games in a week. But that wasn’t his biggest outing on the sporting stage.

This was…the 1935 U.S. Open Golf Championship at Oakmont in Pittsburgh.

1935 U.S. Open Golf Championship
First Round June 6, 1935
#1 -1 Under Par
Butch Krueger
 United States
71
−1

#2 E
Roland MacKenzie
 United States

72

T3 +1 Over Par
Herman Barron
 United States

73
+1
Cliff Spencer
 United States
Horton Smith
 United States
Jimmy Thomson
 Scotland

T7 74 +2 Over Par
Tommy Armour
 United States

Ed Dudley
 United States
Jim Foulis
 United States
Macdonald Smith
 Scotland

ALVIN KRUEGER LEADS NATIONAL OPEN OPENING DAY FIELD
Making the only successful attack on Oakmont’s dreaded par after one of the most calamitous opening days in the history of the United States Open golf championship, Alvin (Butch) Krueger, 29 years old semi-pro pitcher and a golf professional at Beloit, Wis., yesterday led an international field of shot makers with 35-36 71, one under par. The red-headed Wisconsin entry, a “dark horse,” was the only player among 157 starters to crack par for the full route over a course that raised havoc with some of the most famous figures in American golf. Rallies Near End He pulled a garrison finish to take over the first day’s lead from Roland MacKenzie, former amateur ace and now professional at the Congressional Country club of Washington, D. C. MacKenzie’s par-equalling round, 3S-34 72, had stood up under heavy bombardment most of the afternoon. Krueger touched off the fireworks at the close of nearly 12-hours of desperate, heart-breaking warfare with the bunkers of Oakmont. In this, the Thirty-Ninth National Open Tournament, for weeks there had been tales about the horrors and hazards of the Oakmont course. It took 301 strokes to finish first in the 1927 open tourney, played here, and natives predicted it would take as many if not more this time. “Yeah,” said Krueger, “I heard that, too, but what of it? If a fellow hits ’em straight he’s bound to score.” With few exceptions. Krueger “hit ’em straight” yesterday and he hit them long, too. So, as the sun dipped behind the Allegheny Mountains, he came in with a one-under-par 71, fashioned from a 35 and a 36. This feat supplanted the early leader, Roland MacKenzie, former well-known amateur and now professional at the Congressional Country’ Club. Washington. D. C.. who had a par 72.

It was the longest and by all odds the most gruelling start for any American Open championship since the event was last held on this back-breaking, 6,981-yard layout eight years ago. More than half the field failed to break 80. At least a dozen were within hailing distance of old man par but only two were able to draw up level and look him in the eye as Krueger came through to beat him in the stretch! and overhaul MacKenzie. Although Gene Sarazen’s 75 left him four shots behind at the outset and champion Olin Dutra’s 77 was six strokes off the pace, the vanguard of contenders was well bunched. Third Place Tie Trailing with 73’s, in a tie for third place, were Herman Barron of White Plains, N. Y., Cliff Spencer of Washington, D. C, Horton Smith of Chicago, and Jimmy Thomson, the “siege gun” from Long Beach, Calif. Another quartet was bracketed at 74. comprising big Ed Dudley of Philadelphia, Tommy Armour and Jim Foulis of Chicago, and MacDonald Smith, the Scotch veteran from Glendale, Calif. Most of these old or new figures In the title hunt had opportunities to beat Krueger to the scoring punch in the closing drive, but none was able to match the cool, calculating skill of the 29 years old Wisconsin player. Competing in his second National Open, the slim, wiry Krueger withstood terrific tension to play the last six holes in one under par, giving as fine a shot making exhibition in “the pinches” as ever made in the pitching box. His 35 Going Out Krueger had served notice of his sensational finish by going out in 35. two under par and equalling the day’s best performance for the first half of Oakmont’s bunkered battleground. He had par apparently whipped to a standstill, scoring “knockdowns” by dropping a five-foot putt for a birdie on the second hole and barely missing an eagle as he ran a 30-footer “dead” to the ninth pin. By this time the survivors of an original gallery of more than 4,000 spectators had heard the word and flocked in pursuit of the westerner. Whether or not this rattled him, he experienced a temporary lapse. He scrambled from the rough for his par in the 10th, was bunkered and lost a stroke on each of the next two holes before buckling down to a brilliant finish. His 12-foot putt dropped for a deuce on the 164-yard 13th, and he got down another of equal length on the 14th to save his par. The red head took three putts from 80-feet on the loth, which was entirely excusable and among the day’s commonest occurrences, but he came back to furnish his biggest thrill on the 234-yard 16th. Using a brassie off the tee, he hit the ball within a foot of the cup, for his second deuce. He had par under control again ana made no mistakes as he collected fours on the last two holes. playing a great iron on the home hole.’

Second Round
Butch fired a 77 to finish +4, 2 behind Jimmy Thompson.

Third Round
Saturday, June 8 (morning)
Butch shot a 78, the night best round but tied with Walter hagen for 4th, +10

Fourth and Final Round
Saturday, June 8 1935 (afternoon)
Butch shot a disappointing 80, finishing tied for 6th, +18as Sam Parks, Jr. won +11 and the $1,000 winners check. Butch won $218, equivalent to $3,927.77 today.

A couple of months later, the headline read:
KRUEGER TIES WITH RUNYAN FOR GOLF LEAD
Pros Shoot Sizzle 67 to Top Field of 130 in $5,000 Louisville Open (By Associated Press) LOUISVILLE, Ky., Oct. 12. Led by the sizzling 67 of Alvin “Butch” Krueger and Paul Runyan, a field of 130 golfers, all but a half dozen of them professionals, today moved into the second round of the Louisville $5,000 open. Krueger, semi-pro baseball pitcher of Beloit, Wis., who said he had tried every form of sport and turned to golf seriously only two years ago,’ and Runyan, White Plains, N. Y., pro who has chased golf birdies nearly all his life, were four under par on the course. The low 50 and ties in today’s 18 hole round move into the 36 hole final Sunday. Tied for second, a stroke behind the leaders were Frank Walsh, Chicago, and Victor Ghezzl, Deal, N. J. (who won the 1941 PGA Championship), with 68s. Ed Dudley of Philadelphia, Arthur Bell of San Mateo, Cal., E. R. Whltcombe of the British Ryder cup team, Terl Johnson, Winter Haven, Fla., and Al Zimmerman, Northwest Open titlist from Portland, Ore., were tied up for fifth position with 69 each. Only two top flight contenders failed to qualify. Leo Dlegel, former P.G.A. and Canadian Open champion, withdrew at the turn when his card showed 41, and Alfred Perry, British Open champion, with 78 was the only member of the Ryder cup team eliminated.

A week later, in Oklahoma City, OK, on Saturday, October 19, 1935, found him battling Gene Sarazen at the National Professional Championship at the Twin Little Golf Club and beat ‘The Gentleman’ 2 and 1, advancing into the field of 16 on Sunday. The 29 year old Beloit redhead, who was competing in his first P.G.A tournament ‘is probably one of the most talented athletes in the country. He has averaged three games a week pitching for the Madison Blues and has a basketball record which made him considerable money on the professional side. He has been a golf professional only a little more than three years, but it didn’t take him long to make himself known, for he is now one of the finest of the younger pros.

Their match, the seventh of sixteen to go out, brought out the largest morning gallery of the week, one which grew to 4,000 by the time they left the tenth tee. They had come up to the ninth all even, and the 11th saw Krueger go one up. saracen evened it at the next hole, but Butch took the 14th and 15th with handsome golf, while the little Italian wa struggling to say on the fairways. That two up lead was sufficient to save Krueger from one of the typical Sarazen finishes. All Butch needed to shot out the three time winner of this crown was that noble niblick on the 17th, just when it appeared that Gene would win the hole and prolong the match to the finishing hole.

On December 10, 1935, Alvin Krueger, Beloit, Wis., was the 54 hole leader in the Sarasota Open as he fired a corse record 66. With the heading, ‘He can Groove ‘em Now’ as the photo state that Alvin Krueger, Beloit, Wisc., Pro Baseball pitcher who doubles in golf, grooved his efforts recently to lead the field in the Sarasota, FLA, $2000 Open Golf Tournament with a 67, four under par, for the first round. (He broke the course record the next day with a 66). Krueger is a lead-off specialist, have paced the National Open field to the first turn at Oakmont last June.”

In 1936, ‘Butch’ was one of the most sought after golfers for endorsements. He joined Al Espinosa and Babe Didrikson on the staff of The P. Goldsmith Sons, Inc., Cincinnati and had his name on Goldsmith woods and irons in two price ranges. The Grueger woods were sold for $9 and $6.50; the irons (flange soled) were $7.50 and $5. His performance identifies him as a ‘shining one of the youngsters stars with a fine future ahead of him. An all-around athlete, he has been a pro golfer only five years and is picked by Al Espinosa, head of the Goldsmith playing squad, as a youngster who will stay long with he lands at the top.

Two years later, Alvin ‘Butch’ Krueger tied for sixth in St. Paul Open golf meet. Aug. 4th.

Then on June 11, 1938, Alvin (Butch) Krueger, Beloit pro, the former baseball pitcher from Beloit, shot a sub-par 69 to remain within the first 15with a 148 for the first 36 holes of the U.S. Open Championship at Cherry Hills Country Club, Denver, Colorado.

A year later, Charley Bartlett golf expert of the Chicago Tribune covered the Central Intercollegiate track meet at Milwaukee and Bartlctt asked regarding Alvin ‘Butch; Krueger, the Beloit pro and Madison Blues pitcher. Charley believed that Krueger had few it any superiors in golf from tee to within 140 yards of the green. He felt that Krueger would be one of the big shots in pro link circles were the pitcher/golfer able to putt. Bartlett was one of the few who waited for Krueger to finish at Oakmont some years ago after a majority of the other Eastern golf scribes had written their stories giving a player with a 71. But Bartlett had watched Krueger in Chicago and knew he was a capable performer and Butch came home at dusk with a great finish to top the field The other scribes had to cancel their yarns and sit down and write new leads.

At 12:17 on the 1st Tee #70 in the field, Alvin ‘Butch’ Krueger, Beloit Municipal Golf Course, Beloit, Wis. was pared with Klarke Morse, of Wellston, MO, along with Leo ‘O’Grady, East Amherst, NY, teed up for the Silver Anniversary PGA Championship, at Seaview Country Club Atlantic City, NY on May 25, 1942. In the field were Ben Hogan, Ralph Guldahl, Sam Parks, Jr. (who had won the 1935 U.S. Open) Gene Sarazen, Byron Nelson, Jimmy Demaret, Lloyd Mangrum and Sam Sneed among the 116 best pro golfers in the world.

In 1976, Krueger was named to the Wisconsin Golf Hall Of Fame.
1976 – ALVIN R. “BUTCH” KRUEGER

I never knew Butch Krueger was a red head. I remember him sitting on the bench of the second tee and saying, ‘Just hit it straight down the middle. You’ll never get in trouble and it will allow you to plan on your second shot.’ His hair was gray. But he was still athletic looking. And his tone was always reassuring.

One day I brought my catcher mitt to the course in my golf bag and on one of the fairways, I think it was the fourth, I pulled out my glove and ball Butch and I had a catch. It was one of those rare days in the Fall when few were on the course. That’s one of my most memorable moments with this once leader of the U.S. Open.

Here’s to Butch Krueger who on this Father’s Day should be enjoying watching the U.S. Open from Erin Hills and the Brewer game from his position looking down on all of us.

The Mystical, Mysterious, Magical Tour


Part Houdini, part Blackstone. The Master of Minestrone in Baseball. 2 tablespoons of 30+ rookies, 1 large Korean import. 1 slightly crumbling superstar. 3 great young arms. 1 relief pitcher. An overpaid starting pitcher who has been on the DL more than not. Hercules who sometimes plays first. Two catchers who are an equal part of one. A second baseman with all the speed in the universe but no baseball brain. A centerfielder who simply can’t find his hitting grove. And absolutely there is no rhyme err thyme or reason why this concoction should work. But the Wizard of Whitefish Bay has leaned on a learned master in his dugout and worked closely with a newbie GM, and stirred this unbelievable pot of people like himself into a winning unit. In fact, his team, the beloved Milwaukee Brewers have risen to the top of the Central Division of the National League on Sunday, June 11, 2017. Are you kidding me?

Last night in Arizona in 106 degree temperatures with the roof open (the D’Back’s owner is so cheap…How cheap is he?) there was a 30+ refugee at First Base, a 30+ refugee at 2nd base; a multidimensional player at 3B; a first baseman playing left field (and it looked like a 1st baseman who was playing left field); a rookie in centerfield who got his first hit on Monday, sent down on Wednesday, brought back up on Thursday; and regular players in right field, shortstop and catching.

The night before, in 106 degree temperatures with the roof open (the D’Back’s owner is so cheap…How cheap is he?) every regular position player was used in a two run victory. Every player off the bench was used. That doesn’t usually happen in non-extra inning games. But the Wizard of Whitefish Bay was busy mixing his concoction and cooked up another victory.

On the record, they are 1 game ahead of the World Champions of last year. And they have a winning record on the road, one of only three teams in the National League to do so (Washington and Colorado are the others, both leading their divisions). They are the only team in their division with a winning record and one of only five in the league to do so. How good are they? Who knows?

This is a real team…a group of guys who are bonded with…their skipper and their bench coach. They are a group of carrots and onions, with a bit of mystery thrown in. And as they continue on this unbelievable magical tour of a baseball season, from city to city, they are exceeding all expectations.

Don’t wake up.

Don’t do anything you didn’t do yesterday.

Don’t change your socks or shoes.

This is a ride that no one knows how long it will last but on this wave, it is going much longer than anyone expected.

Just enjoy.

Play ball!

#watchingattanasio⚾️

The 127th Day


This date is a memorable date for a couple of reasons. It marked a date which saw power pitchers reach a cornerstone in their lives.

When fans watch baseball today, it is very different from years ago. Nobody has to face ‘The Big Train’ or Herb Score, Bob Feller, Sandy Koufax, Bob Gibson, Nolan Ryan or a Randy Johnson. When you went to a game featuring those power starting pitchers, there was a chance you could see a no-hitter. Yet the one thing you could count on was that batters were just a bit on their toes when facing the heat of these power pitchers.

On this date, in 1917, Babe Ruth of the Boston Red Sox allowed only two hits as he out pitched Walter Johnson of the Washington Senators, 1-0. Can you imagine being there for that game? Oh, by the way, Ruth knocked in the winning run with a sacrifice fly. In that year, he would go on to start 38 games and win 24 against 13 losses. He had an ERA of 2.01. In Babe Ruth’s 1916 season as a pitcher, his record was 23 Wins and 170 Strikeouts, with a 1.75 ERA, 9 Shutouts and 23 Complete Games, as he was at the time, one of the best pitchers in baseball. He was undefeated as a pitcher in postseason play. In 1916, he had a 1-0 record with an ERA of 0.64 against the Brooklyn Dodgers. In 1918, he went 2-0 against Chicago Cubs with a 1.06 ERA. The last time he ever pitched, was in the 1933 All-Star game, when he started and won. Thus what began in 1914 as a pitcher, ended up on the mound 20 years later…a winner. Overall, he won 94 games pitching, losing 46 with a 2.28 ERA lifetime.

Jumping ahead to 1957 on this date, it was another sort of a day in Cleveland as the Indians were facing the New York Yankees in a night game. Herb Score, the fireballing left hander was coming off of a 20 win season the year before where he finished with a 20-9 record with 5 shutouts, an ERA of 2.53 with 263 strikeouts. In his first two years, he was an All-Star and was already 2-1 in the ’57 season. Facing Gil McDougald, as the second batter in the inning, the count was 2 and 2. He shook off the both the curve and slider because he felt he lacked command of his breaking stuff. On his 12th pitch of the night, he fired a fastball that had helped him earn 508 strikeouts over his first two season.

The pitch was low and inside and McDougald lined it up the middle. This is what Herb Score said about the rest. ‘I heard the crack of the bat while my head was down in my follow-through. All I ever saw as my head came up was a white blur. I snapped up my glove, but the white blur blasted through the fingertips and into my right eye. I clutched at my face, staggered and fell. Then I thought, ‘My God, the eye has popped right out of my head!’. Cleveland’s Municipal Stadium was hushed as the career of one of baseball’s best young pitchers and a sure Hall of Famers was finished.

Laying near the mound, bloody and battered, he called on his patron saint for help. He left the field cracking jokes, ‘They can’t say I didn’t keep my eye on that one’, he told teammate Mike Garcia on the field.

In the Yankee clubhouse after the game, McDougald was disconsolate. The seven year veteran and as the American League rookie of the year, told his teammate Hank Bauer, ‘If he loses his sight, I’ll quit baseball. The game’s not that important when it comes to this.”

Talking to Jimmy Cannon the following year he was asked if he felt like giving up. Score said, ‘Give up? I never gave up. When I was first hit, they bandaged both eyes. I could hear people walking. I thought we never appreciated what God does for us. We never think what it is to see. I can see very well. My ankle has been a little sore. But the eye, the only problem I have now is to get the fellows out.’

This date in baseball history is powerful. First we see what a phenomenal player the mighty Babe Ruth was. Secondly, we see what a real man Herbert Jude Score was.

Play Ball!

Who We Picking?


We now have three weeks under our belts and some of the divisions are upside down. But what we see through the crystal ball is that the creme will always rise to the top.

American League

Eastern Division
Baltimore Orioles
They have an excellent manager and it is time for Buck to win a pennant, divisional, but a pennant none the less. The best third baseman in the American League, plus JJ and one of the three best outfielders in the AL today in Jones, make this the team to beat in the East.

Central Division
Cleveland Indians
They have an excellent manager and based off of last year’s performance, they are hungry and talented, plus great starting pitching. Oh ya, they have a sensational second baseman.

Western Division
Texas Rangers
They have a battery of All-Stars and Vu. If they can find solid relief, they could win it all.

Wild Cards
Detroit Tigers
While they lead the league in day games in the first two weeks, their pitching has been solid and they have Miggy.

Chicago White Sox
For four years, I have suggested this is the team to watch. Now, without their star pitcher, they have a chance to succeed.

What’s the matter with the rest?
Tampa Bay just doesn’t have the pitching.
New York Yankees have tradition, an excellent manager and a couple of dopes for owners.
Boston lost their soul to retirement.
Toronto needs a change in managers. Their team is not performing up to their high level of competency.
Minnesota is breathing rarified air. That bubble will burst but be much better than last season.
Kansas City is wandering in a wilderness of ‘what happened?’ with a lack of pitching and timely hitting.
Houston was a flash in the pan. Too many trades with Milwaukee will do that to a team.
Oakland has become the biggest thing in the East Bay and for good reason. They have an exciting team that can win if they have Khris in left. He has no arm.
Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim will never win with Socscia. He has a penchant for making everyone mad. No pitching. But they have the star-of-stars on their team in center. Hello, Mr. Trout.
Seattle is all talk and Cano. If the King dominates, they still need a lot of help.

National League

Eastern Division
Washington Nationals
They have an excellent old-school manager, a brilliant pitching staff and a guy in right, one of the three great outfielders in the National League.

Central Division
Chicago Cubs
They have an over-imaginative manager, and a batting line-up to die for. If you are an opposing pitcher, this is a nightmare to face. They can outhit everybody to win regardless how their pitching holds up this season. Unless they get complacent or suffer a batch full of injuries, they will be in the October Classic.

Western Division
Los Angeles Dodgers
In a division that all of a sudden got weak, they have Clayton and some guys who can hit.

Wild Cards
New York Mets
They are the talk of New York City…the belle of the ball…with a great pitching staff.

Colorado Rockies
The only problem this team has is that it plays in thin air. It has all the hitting in the world and a shockingly good relief corps to go along with it. Plus they have Cargo and the human vacuum cleaner at third.

What’s the matter with the rest?

Miami lost their star pitcher. Yet have one of the most exciting players in the game, Giancarlo Stanton, one of the three great outfielders in the NL today.
Atlanta is a couple of years away as they are rebuilding.
Philadelphia just doesn’t have the guns yet as they are rebuilding.
Pittsburgh doesn’t have a great manager nor the purse strings to finally make it happen. Now they are beginning to fall out of contention … early.
Cincinnati is yet in another rebuilding program. If they hang their hopes on Scooter to take them to the top, they are in for a shocking surprise.
Milwaukee is a AAA team, with a great young manager, a more than tight owner, a kid GM and one of the three great outfielders in the National League as Ryan Braun is the only All-Star on the team today.
St. Louis became blind to what a great team is all about. Too many star players walked away because they want more money. Yet they have the best catcher in baseball behind the plate.
Arizona loves to over perform with the craziest owner in the game today, outside of Miami. But pitching will do them in. But they have the best first baseman in the game today. Goldy gives the D’Backs hope. But not that much.
San Diego. Nope.
San Francisco has a great manager but has not figured out how to secure a starting pitcher to replace a fading group, a relief pitcher who can shut the other team down nor a left fielder of dominant abilities. Unless they fix this right now, they are on a long slide out of grace.

OK. How do you see it?

Play Ball!

It’s Empty Now.


There is a promise in the air which begins with hope. The air in the morning is warmer than what you would expect at this time of the year. The same traffic one would expect from snow birds filling up the roads and freeways are the norm. But there is a different sound in the air.

It is not a ping from the golf courses, nor the sound of another automobile crash as that snow bird didn’t go right on read (its the law down here) as a local citizen banged into snow coast driver. No. It is the sound of a ‘pop’ as the ball hits the glove…not a ‘wack’ yet….just a mild ‘pop’ with the milling sounds of baseball language muffled in the air of conversations. ‘Hey, baby. Hey, baby.’ ‘That’s it. Get it in there.’ ‘My glove is tight. Got to get it flexed out.’ ‘Hum baby hum.’ Grunts and groans are customary as the kinks are beginning to work out. Laughter is heard as the players are back home…in their spring homes…on a practice field at a spring training camp.

This is not only a rite of spring, this maybe the right for spring as attention turns away from all of the political wrangling as the sounds and sights of delight present it self once again in Florida. The Major League teams have their pitchers and catchers reporting this week. And that brings us to that great word ‘hope’. There are smiles on faces, young and old. It is a time for, as ESPN anchors might say, ‘positivity’.

For many, living in San Diego or Oakland, Seattle or Phoenix, in Denver or Minneapolis, in Milwaukee and the South side of Chicago, in Cincinnati or Pittsburgh or even Philadelphia, in Atlanta or Tampa, in Miami or in Orange County California, hope is eternal. There is promise, promise from all of those cities owners that this year the rebuilding is going according to plan, or that this is the year that there will be a breakthrough, but in reality, most of the citizenry in these great areas hang onto hope. Let’s face it, Las Vegas odds are 100-1 that the Reds, Braves, Padres or Brewers will win the NL Pennant. For some reason, the D’Backs and Phillies are only 50-1. Go figure. Over in the AL, the White Sox are 100-1 while the Athletics, Rays and Twins are 50 to 1 to win their Pennant.

Now believe it or not, they say the Angels are 25-1 and that Mariners are 15-1.

On the other hand, the Red Sox are expected to win the AL Pennant as 5-2 odds are placed in their camp. In the NL, the defending World Series Champion Chicago Cubs (almost an oxymoron) have 7-4 odds with the Dodgers 7-2.

So you can see what an important day this will be during the coming week as Spring Training arrives.

Hope will be in the air everywhere.

Play Ball!